Consequences of Money Laundering

Although difficult to quantify, it is clear that money laundering is detrimental to the economy of a country.

Economic Distortions

Money laundering impairs the development of the legitimate private sector through the supply of products priced below production cost, making it therefore difficult for legitimate activities to compete. Criminals may also turn enterprises which were initially productive into sterile ones to launder their funds leading ultimately to a decrease in the overall productivity of the economy. Furthermore, the laundering of money can also cause unpredictable changes in money demand as well as great volatility in international capital flows and exchange rates.

Erosion of Financial Sector

While the financial sector is an essential constituent in the financing of the legitimate economy, it can be a low-cost vehicle for criminals wishing to launder their funds. Consequently, the flows of large sums of laundered funds poured in or out of financial institutions might undermine the stability of financial markets. In addition, money laundering may damage the reputation of financial institutions involved in the scheming resulting to a loss in trust and goodwill with stakeholders. In worst case scenarios, money laundering may also result in bank failures and financial crises.

Reduction in Government Revenue

Money laundering also reduces tax revenue as it becomes difficult for the government to collect revenue from related transactions which frequently take place in the underground economy.

Socioeconomic Costs

The socio-economic effects of money laundering are various because as dirty money generated from criminal activities are laundered into legitimate funds; they are used to expand existing criminal operations and finance new ones. Further to that money laundering may lead to the transfer of economic power from the market, the government and the citizens to criminals, abetting therefore crimes and corruption.

Consequences of Money Laundering